Women Farming

In developing economies, women are primarily responsible for running the household through food crop farming and securing water for household use.

For water-stress communities, women endure the daily and lifelong challenge of trekking several kilometers to fetch water from streams and rivers for cooking, gardening and household consumption. With such lifestyle, women are deprived of the time and opportunity to engage in other income generating activities that will support the family.

As the bread winners of most families, women predominantly depend on agriculture which remains the economic sector most vulnerable to climate change. When climate change affects food crop yield and decimate income, women are affected the most as they tend to control less resources such as land on which to undertake a new agricultural venture or alternative economic activities. This is how water-stress and climate risk plunges women in a vicious cycle of poverty.

Waterclan is working to alleviate this by bridging the gender gap and build their capacity to adapt to water-stress and climate change risks; and empower them with resources and tools to diversify income generating activities. This is in line with evidence from a range of countries showing that increasing the share of household income controlled by women through their own earnings, changes spending in ways that benefit the household; especially children. In fact, according to the World Food Programme, if women farmers had the same access to resources as men, the number of hungry in the world could be reduced by up to 150 million.

According to the World Food Programme, if women farmers had the same access to resources as men, the number of hungry in the world could be reduced by up to 150 million.